How to pass job assessment tests


Some companies require that you complete an assessment test (or series of tests) before offering you a job. 

Often such tests will involve questions that have no right or wrong answers, but rather provide the employer with an understanding of your preferences, personality type, strengths, and weaknesses, as well as concern areas about your emotional and mental health.  

Additional testing may involve logic, math, mechanical, grammar, and spelling questions to gauge your abilities in these areas.

Completing assessment tests well can increase the likelihood that the company will offer you the job. Here's how: 



Before the test


  • Ask what type of test(s) will be administered and how long the testing will take. Say: "Can you tell me what type of tests will be administered? How would you recommend that I prepare?"
  • Learn all that you can about the type of assessment tests using various search engines.
  • Seek to learn how the tests will be given (in-person, by phone, online, etc.)
  • Take practice tests until you feel fully prepared to take the real tests.
  • Contact people who have taken the tests to learn if they recall their own effective answering strategies.
  • Request information about how your test results will be used and how well you must do on them to be considered for the position.
  • If you know that you will have difficulty with aspects of testing such as the math assessment, notify the hiring manager and ask if that skill test is necessary for the position. If it is not, the company may wave that part of the test or overlook your deficiency in that area.
  • Get plenty of rest. Don’t eat heavy foods that could tire you during the test.



During the test


  • Answer questions honestly and consistently (assessment tests tend to ask similar questions repeatedly to ensure you are being truthful).
  • If there is no completely right answer for a multiple choice question, choose the answer that is closest to how you think as it relates to the company and position.    
  • Read questions carefully and check your answers. If you don’t know an answer, make your best guess and move on. Return to such questions if there is time later.
  • Consider the company culture in your responses. Are employees overwhelmingly ambitious, bureaucratic, creative, etc.? Answer in line with their corporate style.
  • When asked moral, ethical or legal-focused questions, choose the answer that is the most moral, ethical and legal.



After the test


  • If you felt like you bombed certain sections, alert the hiring manager. If he or she really wants you, the manager may have the authority to disregard certain results.
  • Write the names of tests you took and any questions that you remember. This will help you speak knowledgeably later with the test administrator or manager.
  • Consider how you can respond better if tested for a different position.
  • Ask the hiring manager how you did. Be open to feedback and positive about criticisms. Mention proof points to disprove or reinforce the test results. Convey wisdom you’ve gained and your willingness to be coached to overcome concern areas.
  • If you are rejected after an assessment test, thank the hiring manager for the opportunity (through a letter or email), emphasize that you are actively building your strengths in the concern areas and express interest in being considered for future opportunities within the company.



The bottom line: Learn to excel at assessment tests! Doing so can help you land a great job.

Related Articles How to answer tricky assessment test questions

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  • Expert resume creation / optimization
  • Expert LinkedIn profile creation / optimization
  • Career coaching
  • Job interview preparation
  • Group/class LinkedIn training 
  • Group/class career training (resumes, applying online, etc.)
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How to email a hiring manager after you applied for the job

how to email a hiring manager, job seeker email, sending an email to a hiring manager,
Increase your chances!
Email the hiring manager
When I was job seeking, I used a two-step process to greatly increase my chances of getting hired. 


  1. I applied online as instructed.
  2. I sent a targeted email message to the probable hiring manager. 


Here's the basic gist of what I wrote to the hiring manager: 

Name, 

I just applied online for your JOB TITLE position, but I am so interested in your job opportunity, I wanted to reach out to you directly because my background makes me particularly well suited for the position.

You seek someone with [A, B, C and D JOB REQUIREMENTS]. As you can see in my attached resume, I’ve handled all of these duties and more with measurable success for PAST COMPANY NAME(s) and would relish doing the same for COMPANY NAME.

I have always wanted to work for [COMPANY NAME] because [EXPLAIN SPECIFICALLY WHY YOU WANT TO WORK FOR THAT COMPANY].

I would love to speak with you about the opportunity at your earliest convenience. When would be a good time to meet? I am available this Thursday and Friday. Next week is also good for me.

I can be reached at PHONE NUMBER or EMAIL ADDRESS. Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to speaking with you soon. -- YOUR NAME.

Attach your resume and other documents such as samples (or include a link to your online portfolio) and a list of your LinkedIn recommendations.


email the hiring manager
Greatly improve your job chances by emailing the hiring manager!

Don't know the person's name or email address? Here is how to find both:


  1. Log into LinkedIn. In the top Search box, type the company name. Once the system has found it, go to the organization's Company Page. Click the Follow button (this tells the company that you are interested in it.)
  2. On the right sidebar, click "See all" under "How You're Connected. Search to find the hiring manager by his / her job title. For example, if you are seeking a sales representative position, look for the sales manager.
  3. Can't find the right person? Type the person's probable title into the search box on the free RecruitmentGeek.com's LinkedIn XRay Search Tool
  4. Once you know the person's name and title, search for his/her email address. Here's how:
  • Type the person's name, title and company name into the Google search bar, followed by the word "email". Often the person's email address will appear in the search results.
  • If that won't work, guess what the email address might be (if you know one person's email address at the company, assume that other employees will have the same email address structure), such as firstname.lastname@companyname.com and try testing that address in the Google search box. If the email address appears in the results along with the person's name, it's probably correct.
  • Still can't find the email address? Visit the free email-format.com site and put the company name into the search box. If it is a large enough company, the email-hyphen site's system will usually be able find the email structure for the company.

The bottom line: Send an email to the hiring manager immediately after applying online. It can greatly improve your job chances ... I know ... it worked for me!


How do you influence the hiring manager when you apply for a job? Share your comments! -- Kathy

Related articles
Following up by phone


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Look to us for expert services and support!

We provide training and services for job seekers, new grads and students including:


  • Expert resume creation / optimization
  • Expert LinkedIn profile creation / optimization
  • Career coaching
  • Job interview preparation
  • Group/class LinkedIn training 
  • Group/class career training (resumes, applying online, etc.)
  • Individual LinkedIn training
  • Recruiter reach services to connect top recruiters to you

To learn more or to get started, visit Services or contact Sue at 847-606-5160 or susanATwiseru.com


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4 lessons you can learn from an entry-level job

Everyone dreams of stepping off the graduation stage and landing a dream job, but unfortunately, that isn’t the reality. The majority of new employees start on the bottom rung, and it can be a long climb up from there.

While entry-level positions are often low-paying, they do provide excellent training and the experience necessary for jobs higher up the ladder.

As you begin your new entry-level role, keep in mind these important lessons:


1) Your Dream Job May Not be Your Dream Job

Plenty of careers look glamorous from the sidelines. Maybe you envy that tour director because she goes on trips around the world, and gets paid $75,000 a year to do it. It certainly sounds like a cushy gig. Score a job as the tour director’s assistant, and a different reality may reveal itself. Maybe she misses every major holiday with her family due to work schedule, and, let’s say she goes on five two-week trips a year for the job. That’s 336 hours straight on-call. Do the math, and you might discover that salary translates into a rather un-glamorous hourly rate.

Starting at the bottom rung gives you the opportunity to observe what’s going on above you. You may discover it’s not the ladder you want to climb.


2) Jobs are More than Just a Paycheck

Some jobs feel like nothing more than pressing the letters and numbers on a keyboard. Sometimes it’s hard to see why it matters. Working for Burt’s Bees (lip balm company) or the identity theft protection company, LifeLock, might seem like completely different careers, yet, both affect people’s lives in positive ways by providing them with tools for health, safety, and longevity.

Look for a role that you will find rewarding regardless of the type of company. When you find the human element in a career, it will remind you why every job matters.


3) Many Good Workers Never Advance

As a newcomer to the employment world, you probably have some preconceived notions about how companies work in terms of promotion and advancement. Come in on time with a good attitude, give them more than they expect of you, and the decision-makers are sure to send you up the ranks. While this is nice in theory, it doesn’t always hold true in the real world. That’s not to say it never happens, but there’s often more to it than just being good at your job.

When you work directly with people who have never been promoted, you realize advancement doesn’t always depend upon skill or desire. From an entry-level position, you can get a feel for the company and your chance of advancing within it, which gives you the opportunity to look for better prospects before settling in.


4) Kindness is a Vital Job Skill

When you start at the bottom, you have no choice but to be nice. With everyone above you in seniority and title, saying the wrong thing to the wrong person can get you into trouble, or even fired. This is a lesson worth strapping to your back and carrying with you up the ladder. Chances are, at some point in your career, you will have a boss who makes you miserable. By paying attention to those things the boss does that makes you dread showing up for work each day, you’ll realize how much kindness makes a difference in employees’ job satisfaction.

Kindness is as much of an asset as computer skills. Adopt it as the basis of your work attitude, so when you get to where you want to be, you will treat those beneath you with the respect you wish you’d been given.

Guest post by SocialMonsters 

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15 ways to land your dream job
60 ways to excel in your first job 
Alternatives before diving into your career 
Choosing a college internship 
Guide for new grad job seekers 
Landing a first job 
Ways to make money in college

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Look to WiserU for expert career services and support!
We provide training and services for job seekers, new grads and college students including:

  • Expert resume creation / optimization
  • Expert LinkedIn profile creation / optimization
  • Career coaching
  • Job interview preparation
  • Group/class LinkedIn training 
  • Group/class career training (resumes, applying online, etc.)
  • Individual LinkedIn training
  • Recruiter reach services to connect top recruiters to you

To learn more or to get started, visit Services or contact Sue at 847-606-5160 or susanATwiseru.com


How to know your LinkedIn connections number after 500+

LinkedIn connection number
Know your numbers!

Want to know how many total LinkedIn connections that you have? If you have more than 500, LinkedIn’s new format makes it hard for you to know your total connections count. That’s because in the new format, the box that used to show you your total LinkedIn connections count has been removed.


LinkedIn connection count
Your total connections (beyond “500+”) used to be shown on your LinkedIn home page.


No worries! It’s easy to find your connections count (even though LinkedIn completely hid it). You just need to know where to look. First, click on the Connections tab and then click the settings icon (it looks like a gear).


LinkedIn connections number
Click Connections and then the gear icon.


Next, click Refresh next to the LinkedIn logo.


LinkedIn connections count
Refreshing your LinkedIn contacts will cause your number of contacts (connections) to appear.

It may take a few minutes to refresh, but once the system has refreshed, your total number of contacts (connections) will appear.

Voila! Now you know how to find your total LinkedIn connections despite LinkedIn’s best attempt to bury your number.  

Have you found your total connections count using this tip? Share your comments ... and please share this article with others who could benefit. If we can be of help to you, let me know and feel free to invite me to connect on LinkedIn. I'm the Kathy Bernard in St. Louis, MO. – Kathy

Related Articles

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Look to WiserU for expert training and services!

We provide LinkedIn training and services for businesses (for sales, marketing, recruiting or fundraising), as well as LinkedIn training and career services for job seekers, new grads and students including:

  • Expert resume creation / optimization
  • Expert LinkedIn profile creation / optimization
  • Career coaching
  • Job interview preparation
  • Group/class LinkedIn training 
  • Group/class career training (resumes, applying online, etc.)
  • Individual LinkedIn training
  • Recruiter reach services to connect top recruiters to you

To learn more or to get started, visit Services or contact Sue at 847-606-5160 or susanATwiseru.com




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