8 tips to master job interview presentations

job interview presentations

Being asked to make a presentation during job interviews has become more common as hiring companies seek to assess candidates’ ability to make presentations as part of their selection process.
Most of the time, employers are asking you to present so that they can assess your communication and persuasion skills, rather than actual content, but be forewarned, that doesn’t mean you should slack off on the content. Follow these 10 tips to make sure that you are well prepared to stand out from competitors during your job interview presentations.
1. Seize the opportunity
Make sure that you understand what’s being requested and that your presentation accomplishes its objectives. For example, if you're applying for a sales position, the employer will want to see if you are believable, likable and capable of winning new prospects, keeping existing customers and building support with internal stakeholders.
2. Know your audience
The more information that you have about your audience, the more you can make your presentation relevant. If you are presenting to a human resources manager, a people-focused presentation may be appropriate, while presenting to IT managers may necessitate a more technically slanted presentation.
3. Mindmap your ideas
Your presentation should comprise three main sections: 1) An introduction, 2) A clear articulation of your argument / theory / viewpoint, and 3) a summary. Create a Mindmap to focus your presentation. Start with the core idea that you want to convey as the center point in the middle of the page, and branch out your ideas from there. Once you have mapped out your ideas, put them into a logical order in your presentation.
4. Don’t over-rely on PowerPoint
We’ve all been subject to boring PowerPoint presentations where presenters put way too much text on each slide and then read every word on every slide. Instead, keep wording to a minimum and use large images to convey your point when possible. Know your presentation inside out so that it flows effortlessly. Consider funky alternatives to Powerpoint, like Prezi, a cloud-based platform that allows presenters to present from a browser, desktop, or mobile device.
5. Rehearse, Rehearse, Rehearse.
Once you’re happy with your presentation, give yourself plenty of time to practice presenting it. Avoid using notes. Instead, use a keyword or two on each slide to prompt a more free flowing presentation.
Take time to breath when orating, and give all decision makers in the room an equal amount of eye contact.
6. Timing
Time yourself during practice sessions and make necessary adjustments to ensure it lasts no longer than the allotted time. Use a watch placed on the podium in front of you to keep you on track.
7. Pre-empt questions
You won’t be able to pre-empt all questions, but identify which questions that you are most likely to be asked and have a game plan for how you will answer. Take your time when answering, don’t argue and keep to the point. If you’re not sure what a question means, ask for it to be expanded.
8. Relax and smile
If you’ve done all the above, making a job interview presentation shouldn't be too tricky, but nerves will inevitably play a part on the day itself. Slow your breathing, don’t rush your words, look at people and smile. Remember that you must be engaging to be convincing.
And finally, practice delivering your presentation out loud, not just in your head.  Consider recording it on video so that you can review it and improve weaker sections.

The bottom line: Be ready to present during your upcoming job interviews …doing so can help youGet a Job!


 How to Get That Job
Guest Post by Jon Simmons, 
Director of How To Get That Job

Jon is a London-based marketer and career coach.

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Tips to help teens land their first job

teen employment, first jobThere are many reasons why teens and college students should get a part-time job. In addition to providing them with a source of income other than their parents’ wallets, jobs can give your children confidence and can teach them a lot about responsibility, being dependable, and working with others.


Help narrow goals

Before your teen starts applying for a job, sit down with him and talk about why he wants to work in the first place. Is he looking for a way to earn extra spending money? Is he hoping to get work experience in an industry that interests him? 

Determining ahead of time what your teen hopes to get out of the job will help him narrow down his application choices.

Keep in mind that teens will need to develop at least a basic resume to submit to employers. Learn about how to create an effective resume here.


Suggest places to look

You can help spread the word about your teen’s employment aspirations by letting friends, coworkers and relatives know she is available to work. Good old-fashioned networking can help teens get hired at all sorts of positions, and chances are good you might get an inside scoop on a job that hasn't been advertised yet. Suggest sources that your teen can check out for job leads, such as Craigslist. Also remind her to keep her eyes peeled for “Help Wanted” signs in windows and suggest that she peruse the classified ads in community newspapers. HireTeen.com may also be a good resource.


landing a first job
Prepare for the interview

Once your teen has applied for a few jobs and is starting to get phone calls asking him to come in for an interview, help get him ready. 

Remind your teen that it’s important to do research about the company and the position, and offer advice on what outfit would be appropriate to wear. 

To prepare your teen on what he might be asked during the interview, BioSpace features 31 common interview questions. Read through them together and have your teen practice answering the questions.


teen driving
Safe driving

Once your teen is hired for her first job, chances are good she’ll be driving herself to and from work at least part of the time. Help her prepare for this road to independence by talking about the importance of having a clean driving record and being safe. Even though you are proud of the way she conducts herself behind the wheel, encourage her to spend time refreshing her knowledge of the rules of the road occasionally.


Talk about money

A first job is a great opportunity to teach your teen about saving money. Granted, he might already have a savings account that you and/or grandparents use to deposit funds for college and future expenses, but this is prime time to start a second account that your teen can manage on his own. Talk about the importance of setting aside a percentage of each paycheck for future goals like a car, as well as another percentage for other more immediate purchases like new clothes for work, a new laptop or smart phone.

The bottom line: You can play a major role in helping your teen or college student get their start in the work world and that experience can lead to future positions, a realization of their career calling and increased maturity. Start now to encourage your child to apply for positions. Doing so can help them ... Get a Job!

Guest post by Social Monsters.


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How to pass job assessment tests


Being considered for a job opportunity?

Some companies may require that you complete an assessment test (or series of tests) before offering you the position. 

Often such tests will involve questions that have no right or wrong answers, but rather provide the employer with an understanding of your preferences, personality type, strengths, and weaknesses, as well as concern areas about your emotional and mental health.  

Additional testing may involve logic, math, mechanical, grammar, and spelling questions to gauge your abilities in these areas.

Completing assessment tests well can increase the likelihood that the company will offer you the job. Here's how: 



Before the test


  • Ask what type of test(s) will be administered and how long the testing will take.
  • Seek to learn how the tests will be given (in-person, by phone, online, etc.)
  • Take practice tests until you feel fully prepared to take the real tests.
  • If you are really deficient in a particular subject that you suspect you will be tested on, such as math, watch step-by-step videos on Khan Academy, a wonderful free site created to provide "free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere."
  • Contact friends who have taken the tests (particularly friends who work at the hiring company). See if they can remember certain questions or their effective answering strategies.
  • Try searching the company's name plus the words "assessment test questions" on Google or other search engine to see if any information about its test is posted online.
  • Request information about how your test results will be used and how well you must do on them to be considered for the position.
  • If you know that you will have difficulty with aspects of testing (such as the math assessment), notify the hiring manager and ask if that skill test is necessary for the position. If it is not, the company may wave that part of the test or overlook your deficiency in that area.
  • Get plenty of rest. Don’t eat heavy foods that could tire you during the test.



During the test


  • Answer questions honestly and consistently (assessment tests tend to ask similar questions repeatedly to ensure that you are being truthful). So for example, if a test asks, "Have you ever stolen from a company?", and you answer "No", the first time you are asked, don't change your answer to "Yes" if asked, "Have you ever taken office supplies home from work?"
  • If there is no completely right answer for a multiple choice question, choose the answer that is closest to how you think as it relates to the company and position. (Don't over think it!)    
  • Read questions carefully and check your answers. If you don’t know an answer, make your best guess and move on. Return to such questions if there is time later.
  • Consider the company culture in your responses. Are employees overwhelmingly ambitious, bureaucratic, creative, etc.? Answer in line with their corporate style.
  • When asked moral, ethical or legal-focused questions, choose the answer that is the most moral, ethical and legal.



After the test


  • If you felt like you bombed certain sections, alert the hiring manager. If he or she really wants you, the manager may have the authority to disregard the results.
  • Write the names of tests you took and any questions you remember. This will help you speak knowledgeably later with the test administrator or manager.
  • Consider how you can respond better if tested for a different position.
  • Ask the hiring manager how you did. Be open to feedback and positive about criticisms. Mention proof points to disprove or reinforce the test results. Convey wisdom you’ve gained and your willingness to be coached to overcome concern areas.
  • If you are rejected after an assessment test, thank the hiring manager for the opportunity, emphasize that you are actively building your strengths in the concern areas and express interest in being considered for future opportunities within the company.

Learn to excel at assessment tests! Handling them well can definitely help youGet a Job! 

Any comments or suggestions about job assessment tests? Share them via the Contact tab. Thanks for reading! -- Kathy


Related Article

How to answer tricky assessment test questions 



We provide training and services for individuals and businesses including:
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  • Group LinkedIn training targeted for your group's needs (job search, sales, marketing, recruiting, fundraising, etc.)
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  • Expert LinkedIn profile creation / optimization
  • Expert resume creation / optimization
  • Recruiter reach services to connect top recruiters to you
  • Career coaching
  • Social media coaching for businesses
  • Job interview preparation
To learn more or to get started, visit Services or contact Sue at 847-606-5160 or susanATlinkedwise.com

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5 personal branding tips for your career


Today's overcrowded job market requires more from job candidates than an impressive resume and cover letter to land a great position in a company that shares their culture and values. It also requires crafting a personal brand that epitomizes specifically who they are as qualified job candidates.

Personal branding is a strategy that revolutionized the way in which candidates interact with employers – by building a brand around their names, they have a chance of being approached by recruiters who will already have a clear idea about their professional profile. The web provides lots of opportunities for building a personal brand, with social media serving as the most common platforms for employers to hunt and screen potential candidates.

Here are 5 top tips to leverage social media for creating and growing your personal brand.

Kathy Bernard, Getajobtips.com
Kathy Bernard of
Getajobtips.com
1. Use a profile photo that reflects your personality

In social media, just like everywhere else, a picture can be worth a thousand words. Always have a second look before you upload an image to serve as your profile picture – it will say a lot about your personal brand.

Avoid posting pictures taken in very informal situations and make sure to be extra careful about posting photos of inappropriate social situations – your brand is supposed to enhance your professionalism, not ruin it.

Make sure to use the same profile picture across all your social media profiles. It will help recruiters recognize you and your brand. In some cases, you can use pictures of your family or pets, but only if they're relevant to your goals.

2. Review your posts!

Before clicking 'Publish', review your post once or twice, bearing in mind that whatever you post will contribute to the perceptions people have about your brand. Never write your posts in haste and always edit those words you've chosen with a purpose in mind. Remember that people will be reading your post word for word – make sure the tone and style are right and unambiguous.

Once you're sure your post won't offend anyone, try to think about it in terms of its value – will it add anything to the community? Does this post reinforce the message of your brand? Does it reflect your goals or passions?

3. React to other people's posts with care

We all tend to react emotionally to whatever message makes it our way, especially if it contains criticism. Don't feel pressured to respond immediately. Take your time in composing an appropriate response. Posts can be taken out of context and presented somewhere else as your opinion, so even if you think it's just a joke, don't forget that it can really hurt your brand.

4. Be consistent

When it comes to brands, consistency is a key feature that helps brands to make it in their industries. Consistency is perhaps even more important for personal brands – don't forget about it. Behave consistently in social media and remember that building a brand is a process that takes time – picture by picture, post by post.

5. Just be yourself

Don't settle and follow the crowd. Try to find your own style and qualities that will make you attractive to potential employers and professional contacts. Dare to stand out! Originality is after all the very point of personal branding.

The bottom line: Building and growing a personal brand should be a must for anyone looking for interesting job opportunities and industry recognition. It goes without saying that social media provide best occasions for sharing your voice and helping your brand resonate with others. Use them wisely and you'll see your professional network flourish.



Tess Pajaron, Open Colleges
Guest post by Tess Pajaron. Thanks, Tess! -- Kathy

Tess Pajaron is a Community Manager at Open Colleges, an online learning provider based in Sydney, Australia. She has a background in Business Administration and Management.

Follow Tess on Twitter at https://twitter.com/Tessedel


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Reaching out on LinkedIn College Edition
SPECIAL - LIVE WEBINAR FOR COLLEGE CAREER CENTER LEADERS AND COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Wed, Mar 25, 2015 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM CDT
Register for FREE LIVE Webinar on Wed. March 25 (9 am Pacific, 10 am Mountain, 12 pm Eastern)  -- The Recording and Slides Will Not Be Available After This Broadcast, except by purchase. 
Will you or your students know how to reach employers on LinkedIn? Help your students defy the under-employment odds affecting 44% of recent grads. 

  • 97% of companies use LinkedIn to find or vet candidates, but only 13% of Millennials are on LinkedIn. That means that new grads who know how to reach employers on LinkedIn have a HUGE advantage. 
  • In fact, according to LinkedIn, those who are active on LinkedIn have a 40 times greater chance of landing a job than those who aren't. 

Improve your students’ chances by watching Reaching Out on LinkedIn for Career: College Edition to learn EXACTLY what your students need to know to reach employers to land a degree-worthy career. 

In just 50 minutes (+Q and A), you will ... 

  • Discover EXACTLY how students can research and reach recruiters and hiring managers on LinkedIn 
  • Learn PRECISELY what recruiters are looking for on candidate profiles 
  • SEE all of the ways to connect with hiring decision makers to get the BEST RESPONSE and the BEST RESULTS 

This is an advanced presentation building upon LinkedWISE LinkedIn Boot Camp: College Edition, the premiere presentation for preparing students to establish a strong LinkedIn presence and improve their chances of landing a degree-worthy career. 


We provide training and services for individuals and businesses including:
  • Individual LinkedIn training (for career or business)
  • Group LinkedIn training targeted for your group's needs (job search, sales, marketing, recruiting, fundraising, etc.)
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  • Expert LinkedIn profile creation / optimization
  • Expert resume creation / optimization
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  • Career coaching
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  • Job interview preparation
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Like what you've learned?
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